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The Navy USS Tennessee (SSBN 734), an Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine completed its demonstration and Shakedown Operation Feb. 22 with the submerged launch of an unarmed Trident II D5 missile off the coast of Cape Canaveral, Fla. Reserve Airmen from the 920th Rescue Wing, Patrick Air Force Base, Fla., cleared the launch path of mariners in an HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopter to allow the safe launch of the missile. (U.S. Air Force photo/Capt. Cathleen Snow)
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Posted: 3/7/2012

ContainedContained
Contained

While clearing the launch path of mariners in an HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopter off the nearby coast of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Airmen from the 920th Rescue Wing, Patrick Air Force Base, Fla., communicated with the crew of this container ship to change course allowing them to deliver cargo out of harm's way. The Rescue Wing Airmen worked closely with their Navy mission partners of the nearby Naval Ordinance Test Unit to safely launch a D-5 Trident Missile Feb. 22. (U.S. Air Force photo/Capt. Cathleen Snow)
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Posted: 3/7/2012

Rocket AirmenRocket Airmen
Rocket Airmen

Airmen from the 920th Rescue Wing, Patrick Air Force Base, Fla., cleared the launch path of mariners in an HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopter off the nearby coast of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station to allow the safe launch of a Trident Missile Feb. 22. The Navy's USS Tennessee, an Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine, underwent demonstration and shakedown operations (DASO) and successfully fired the D-5 Trident test missile off the coast to ensure that the submarine's crew could safely meet the stringent requirements for handling, maintaining and operating her strategic weapons system. (U.S. Air Force photo/Capt. Cathleen Snow)
Rocket Airmen


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Posted: 3/7/2012

Suiting upSuiting up
Suiting up

PATRICK AIR FORCE BASE, Fla.- Staff Sgt. Leslie Forshaw, assistant chief of public affairs for the 920th Rescue Wing, serves as a model for NASA personnel to demonstrate how to properly remove the gear from an astronaut if something were to happen to the shuttle during lift off or landing. The 920th RQW provides rescue support for all NASA space shuttle launches from Kennedy Space Center. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman First Class Natasha Dowridge)
Suiting up


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Posted: 12/4/2011

Comm checkComm check
Comm check

PATRICK AIR FORCE BASE, Fla.- Air Force and NASA members of the Joint Task Force conduct a medical briefing here for the upcoming space shuttle launch. In a worst-case scenario, if something were to happen during lift off or landing, Air Force rescue crews would be prepared to properly remove the gear from an astronaut to administer life-saving medical treatment. The 920th provides rescue support for all NASA space shuttle missions from nearby Kennedy Space Center. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman First Class Natasha Dowridge)
Comm check


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Posted: 12/4/2011

Team RescueTeam Rescue
Team Rescue

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Team Rescue, comprising of Air Force Reservists from the 920th Rescue Wing, stand tall during the final landing of the Space Shuttle Atlantis, July 21, 2011. This group of Reserve Airmen are comprised of HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopter pilots, crew, pararescueman and flight medics. These rescue responders have been the insurance policy ready to perform the world's largest search and rescue mission if called upon, during the astronauts' daring entries and exits into space. This is the final flight for the Atlantis marking the end of NASA?s manned space program. Rescue reservists from the 920th RQW, Patrick Air Force Base, Fla., have been present since the start of the shuttle mission to clear the range and stand by in the event of a mishap. The 920th RQW uses HC-130P/N King refueling aircraft and HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopters to transport their highly-trained and effective rescue teams, often called Guardian Angels. Their unique combat search-and-rescue skills and equipment make them the most qualified in the world to respond to any emergency scenario, the worst being one that would cause the astronauts to bail out over the Atlantic Ocean during liftoff. Even though the shuttle mission has come to an end, the Airmen from the 920th RQW are on hand for every rocket launch to clear the 1,000 square mile area, called the Eastern Range, over the Atlantic Ocean. (U.S Air Force photo/Major Simpson)
Team Rescue


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Posted: 7/21/2011

Touch down!Touch down!
Touch down!

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - The Space Shuttle Atlantis makes its return to Earth, July 21, 2011. This is the final flight for the Atlantis marking the end of NASA's manned space program. Rescue reservists from the 920th Rescue Wing, Patrick Air Force Base, Fla., have been present since the start of the shuttle mission to clear the range and stand by in the event of a mishap. The 920th RQW uses HC-130P/N King refueling aircraft and HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopters to transport their highly-trained and effective rescue teams, often called Guardian Angels. Their unique combat search-and-rescue skills and equipment make them the most qualified in the world to respond to any emergency scenario, the worst being one that would cause the astronauts to bail out over the Atlantic Ocean during liftoff. Even though the shuttle mission has come to an end, the Airmen from the 920th RQW are on hand for every rocket launch to clear the 1,000 square mile area, called the Eastern Range, over the Atlantic Ocean. (U.S. Air Force photo/Capt. Ryan Liss)
Touch down!


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Posted: 7/21/2011

Touch down!Touch down!
Touch down!

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - The Space Shuttle Atlantis makes its return to Earth, July 21, 2011. This is the final flight for the Atlantis marking the end of NASA's manned space program. Rescue reservists from the 920th Rescue Wing, Patrick Air Force Base, Fla., have been present since the start of the shuttle mission to clear the range and stand by in the event of a mishap. The 920th RQW uses HC-130P/N King refueling aircraft and HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopters to transport their highly-trained and effective rescue teams, often called Guardian Angels. Their unique combat search-and-rescue skills and equipment make them the most qualified in the world to respond to any emergency scenario, the worst being one that would cause the astronauts to bail out over the Atlantic Ocean during liftoff. Even though the shuttle mission has come to an end, the Airmen from the 920th RQW are on hand for every rocket launch to clear the 1,000 square mile area, called the Eastern Range, over the Atlantic Ocean. (U.S. Air Force photo/Capt. Ryan Liss)
Touch down!


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Posted: 7/21/2011

Touch down!Touch down!
Touch down!

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - The Space Shuttle Atlantis makes its return to Earth, July 21, 2011. This is the final flight for the Atlantis marking the end of NASA's manned space program. Rescue reservists from the 920th Rescue Wing, Patrick Air Force Base, Fla., have been present since the start of the shuttle mission to clear the range and stand by in the event of a mishap. The 920th RQW uses HC-130P/N King refueling aircraft and HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopters to transport their highly-trained and effective rescue teams, often called Guardian Angels. Their unique combat search-and-rescue skills and equipment make them the most qualified in the world to respond to any emergency scenario, the worst being one that would cause the astronauts to bail out over the Atlantic Ocean during liftoff. Even though the shuttle mission has come to an end, the Airmen from the 920th RQW are on hand for every rocket launch to clear the 1,000 square mile area, called the Eastern Range, over the Atlantic Ocean. (U.S. Air Force photo/Major Matthew Simpson)
Touch down!


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Posted: 7/21/2011

The final landing STS-135The final landing STS-135
The final landing STS-135

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Two Air Force Reserve HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopters, pilots and crew fly over the Space Shuttle Atlantis, July 21, 2011, at the Kennedy Space Center landing strip. Rescue reservists from the 920th Rescue Wing, Patrick Air Force Base, Fla., have been present since the start of the shuttle mission to clear the range and stand by in the event of a mishap. The 920th RQW uses HC-130P/N King refueling aircraft and HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopters to transport their highly-trained and effective rescue teams, often called Guardian Angels. Their unique combat search-and-rescue skills and equipment make them the most qualified in the world to respond to any emergency scenario, the worst being one that would cause the astronauts to bail out over the Atlantic Ocean during liftoff. Even though the shuttle mission has come to an end, the Airmen from the 920th RQW are on hand for every rocket launch to clear the 1,000 square mile area, called the Eastern Range, over the Atlantic Ocean. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Major Matthew Simpson)
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Posted: 7/21/2011

Doing what they're trained to doDoing what they're trained to do
Doing what they're trained to do

PHILIPPINE SEA, North Pacific Ocean -- Air Force pararescuemen flank Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong and David R. Scott, sitting in the Gemini 8 space craft, while awaiting the arrival of the recovery ship, the USS Leonard F. Mason after splashdown in the Pacific Ocean Mar. 16, 1966. Reservists from the 920th Rescue Wing at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla. provide first-response contingency medical and rescue support for all NASA shuttle launches. With the advent of the NASA's new capsule-based, manned-spaceflight program, Constellation, Air Force pararescuemen will once again greet astronauts on the high seas following splashdown. (NASA courtesy photo)
Doing what ...


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Posted: 7/9/2011

Pararescuemen back thenPararescuemen back then
Pararescuemen back then

301st Aerospace Rescue Recovery Squadron CH/HH-3 Pelican amphibious helicopter space shuttle support crew members pose in front of the helicopter. From left to right: Master Sgt. David McKay, pararescueman, Tech. Sgt. Frank Beaudoin, pararescueman, Maj. John Goodwin, pilot, Lt. Col. William Johnson, pilot, and Master Sgt. Robert Romph. The 920th was originally the 301st Rescue Squadron, which was activated in 1956, becoming the Air Force Reserve's first and only rescue squadron. In 1961 the wing began a long relationship with NASA and the U.S. space program, providing rescue-contingency operations for the first Mercury launch. (Courtesy photo)
Pararescuemen ...


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Posted: 7/9/2011

    

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